Phase 1 – Why is Nahanni important to you?

Update December 30, 2009:

Thank you for sharing why Nahanni is important to you.  Many participants expressed how special a place Nahanni is, for reasons such as the spectacular and undisturbed wilderness and wildlife, a premier canoeing destination, the traditional homelands of Aboriginal communities, and as an example of a cooperative conservation initiative that contributes to Canada’s network of protected areas.

Original question (posted November 19, 2009):

For some people the Nahanni watershed is home, for others it provides world-class wilderness recreational activities, for others it is an important protected area for wildlife.  What do you value most about the Nahanni National Park Reserve? What is your personal connection to Nahanni?

This discussion topic is closed. You can still review the discussion but it will no longer accept comments or votes.

ellen Comment 1

11:51am, 30 November 2009

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Nahanni is a dream destination for me as a canoe trip experience.

Tom N Comment 2

12:54pm, 30 November 2009

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Even if I can’t get to experience the park first hand, there should still be places that are wild and a challenge to get to. Not everyone needs to get everywhere by bus tour. I want to know that wild places exist, just like I want to know commercial parks exist too – the choice is important.

Seen Alot Comment 3

12:24pm, 1 December 2009

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It’s wilderness and wildlife values are of paramount importance over-riding all other aspects and uses

2canoe2 Comment 3.1

7:08pm, 2 December 2009

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I as most value the wildlife or wilderness of this and many other parks, therefore I can agree. I can,t agree these are the most paramount or important value to this area. The most important value for the park is it’s undisturbed and natural landscape.

chas Comment 4

3:58pm, 1 December 2009

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Our self-guided canoe trip (Porcupine Lae to Nahanni Butte in early September 2007) was a very special event.

I am a Canadian and value our history (and the history of our aborigines) and was very satisfied with the manner in which we were treated in Nahanni Butte at the end of our 320KM trip.

It is very important that we preserve this type of experience for our children.

I would like to help, in any way I can, to keep this experience as natural as it was for us.

 

Laani – Parks Canada Comment 4.1

Planner

5:06pm, 8 December 2009

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I’m sitting in the Band Office in Nahanni Butte with George, a member of the Naha Dehe Consensus Team. George would like me to pass on the message:

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“It’s nice that your recognize our community, we appreciate people stopping in Nahanni (thanks for feeding the mosquitoes!). We’d be happy for you to come again.”

familyman Comment 4.2

8:36pm, 16 December 2009

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I am an american and i am proud of canada!!

Daryl Comment 4.2.1

6:17pm, 8 January 2010

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Thank you from a candian who enjoys the United states!I’m planning my next trip to Monument national in Arizona. Love that desert!

boreal Comment 5

7:49pm, 1 December 2009

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Nahanni is important to me because it is a healthy, pristine, biologically diverse, and remote wilderness. Given climate change, human population growth, and other environmental challenges, Nahanni represents a world-class example of the best of what’s left of the natural world.

Cnut Perrin Comment 6

8:32pm, 1 December 2009

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Nahanni is not only a dream ecologically, (and I wholly agree with the other comments) but it is also a good example, since its expansion, of Native Communities and grass-roots conservation initiatives coming together to help inform government initiatives on what is important to some Canadians.

Bufflehead Comment 7

10:59pm, 1 December 2009

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The Nahanni is a spectacular wilderness that deserves to be protected in its natural state for all flora and fauna. It also provides an unparalleled canoeing/hiking wilderness experience. While the fate of the Peel Watershed, the Thelon River and other great northern wildernesses remain threatened, it is all the more important that the Nahanni be preserved.

I was fortunate to spend 8 weeks paddling and hiking in Nahanni 3 years ago and will be returning again for a 3 month canoe/backpacking trip next summer. The challenge of river, the hiking, the solitude and the encounters with the flora and fauna create an unforgettable experience.

Jorge Comment 8

6:57am, 2 December 2009

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Nahanni is important to me for three main reasons: First, as one of the jewel’s in Canada’s very limited network of protected areas. As such it is a place where ecological processes can occur without major disruption from human activity. Second, it is important to me as one of the world’s premier wilderness canoeing destinations. Third, it is important to me as an Aboriginal Cultural Landscape in which culture and nature are inextricably fused into a larger whole.

Kootenays Comment 9

8:13am, 2 December 2009

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The Nahanni is truly a very special area, no way should development take place as has happen in a number of the other National Parks.

jawright Comment 10

8:37am, 3 December 2009

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Since 1970 when I lived in High level, my dream had always been to travel to the Nahanni. Over 30 years later my dream was realised when I travelled from the Falls to Nahanni Butte with Nahanni River Adventures. This area and expansion MUST remain undisturbed. From the moment my foot entered the raft, my smile got wider every day – just ask the guides. An unequalled paradise.

Al

Daryl Comment 10.1

6:24pm, 8 January 2010

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I read Dangerous River in 1967 and waited 40 years before my wonderful wife found out it was a dream of mine and she made it happen in 2007.

Jane Comment 11

7:09pm, 4 December 2009

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I am thrilled that the whole watershed is now protected –this will make preservation of the environment a reality.

This cooperation of the Deh Cho and the Federal Government is great –lets us hope this level of cooperation sets a trend for other areas

RobinR Comment 12

6:50pm, 20 December 2009

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the Nahanni is a dream destination for many canoeists across the country. To a certain extent it doesn’t matter if they get there but we need to have the dream out there. I was fortunate enough to paddle from Island Lake in 2008. That may have been the trip of a lifetime but now the dream is to go back and paddle from the Moose Ponds.

Rob Evans-Toronto-Canada Comment 13

9:09pm, 25 December 2009

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As a Canadian who enjoys the out of doors which is what Canada is famous for I went down the Nahanni River by canoe(Black Feather) about 15 years ago. Please do nog delay. This is the best trip I have ever taken. Hot springs, Victoria Falls is twice the height of Niagara or several 4000 foot canyons. My canoe partner and I went over several rapids in the two weeks but did not tip in the sturdy 17 canoes. The Guides were excellent cooks. Lots of wildlife.

georgegardner47 Comment 14

11:10pm, 8 January 2010

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Canada has some of the most spectacular scenery in the world. We need to preserve as many of these special places as possible for our own sanity and the preservation of wildlife.

dumontlc@hotmail.com Comment 15

6:44am, 10 January 2010

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I was raised on tales of the Nahanni. My father, John Norgaard, was a prospector on the Flat River, off the Nahanni, and a trapper in what was then known as the Headless Valley. He spoke of the falls, and the lake at the summet, and Failey, Kraus, the Turner and Lindbergs were his contemporaries. I took the canoe trip in 2007 to visit the places I had heard so much about. The scenery is spectacular and the area should be preserved as it is unique.