Phase 1 – How do we bring Nahanni to Canadians?

Update December 30 2009:

Although several participants suggested that in-person experiences are hard to replicate, there was strong support in this discussion topic for the development of “virtual visits”, through the development of audio-visual products such as videos and enhanced youth education programs. Parks Canada is starting to use new ways to reach Canadians, such as online videos.  For example, visit Parks Canada’s YouTube channel at http://www.youtube.com/user/ParksCanadaAgency, where there are 2 videos of Nahanni posted.  Suggestions under this decision topic are reflected in the Key Strategy: Naha Dehé, A Gift to be Shared, which indicates outreach education as a main objective.

Original Question (posted November 23 2009):

Because of the remoteness of the park, relatively few people may ever experience the park in person. However, Nahanni National Park Reserve belongs to all Canadians. How can Parks Canada work to build a sense of connection and understanding of the significance of Nahanni people may never have the chance to visit? What opportunities for virtual visits could be developed?

This discussion topic is closed. You can still review the discussion but it will no longer accept comments or votes.

Tom N Comment 1

12:49pm, 30 November 2009

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Google Earth kmz file with links to 3D tours, videos (both by Parks and visitors), photos, trip blogs, audio pieces of the falls and animal sounds etc. … Give all access to upload personal material to the website and see what happens.

boreal Comment 2

7:58pm, 1 December 2009

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I strongly support “virtual visits” and hope that some short web videos could be provided on the internet that would let everyone see some representative habitats and wildlife species. Such videos should include natural sounds as well. I believe that the National Park Service in the U.S. has tested some similar web video products for some parks, perhaps including one that allows someone to move the view in a panoramatic fashion to see a much larger landscape.

Laani – Parks Canada Comment 2.1

Planner

2:56pm, 8 December 2009

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There have been dozens of films and books on Nahanni, with more in the works.

Parks Canada does have a YouTube channel, http://www.youtube.com/user/ParksCanadaAgency

-though there are no official clips from Nahanni at the moment.

The idea of virtual visits is definitely supported by our national outreach strategy and something that is in the works for Nahanni.

Laani – Parks Canada Comment 2.1.1

Planner

10:15am, 16 December 2009

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I stand corrected. There is a short video about the expansion of Nahanni.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ybn69NPoTiI (you’ll have to copy and paste the url as it isn’t hyperlinking properly)

emaltin Comment 3

6:59am, 2 December 2009

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youth need to be exposed to wild places so they need to be learning about these places in school and then they could be part of a youth experience in the park. Katamavik is a great nation wide program to bring youth to communities. Why not have a youth nation wide program to bring them to our parks? This should be well funded and linked to in-college/university programs.

Bufflehead Comment 4

12:28pm, 2 December 2009

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I think school visits by people who have travelled through our parks would be inspiring. Children being able to follow canoers/hikers while they prepare for a wilderness trip and following them during the trip could teach children about wilderness travel and expose them to the benefits of national parks and active living.

2canoe2 Comment 5

7:32pm, 2 December 2009

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As long as the Nahanni is brought to Canadians and the rest of the world by way of a virtual tour then it can still be one place only few will ever see in person and that is part of its attraction. If it becomes an amusement park or even accessible to everyone it losses that allure.

Jane Comment 6

7:12pm, 4 December 2009

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Trails but not roads

Human power but no more flights

Laani – Parks Canada Comment 6.1

Planner

3:03pm, 8 December 2009

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Thanks for the comment. Parks Canada is not looking at developing new roads for tourism.

Keough Comment 7

8:36pm, 13 December 2009

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I’d like to bring to this blog the idea of using the television feature “THE NAHANNI AND REBEKKA DAWN” as a way of celebrating and giving attention to the land features within the park expansion. This 45 minute documentary-entertainment primarily features the areas that have recently been protected. Rebekka Dawn is our daughter who in the film is a 2-year-old, canoeing, hiking, rappeling, and adventuring with us. Baton Broadcasting owns all rights to this award-winning film, which was selected the nation’s finest privately-produced movie in its year.

gavinrscott Comment 8

4:08pm, 22 December 2009

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If, as Joni Mitchell would say, that we’re at the point of “…putting all the trees in a tree museum…” then we’ve already passed the point of no return. A virtual experience does have a place for education, exploration and gaining insight but there is nothing that can replace the majesty, immensity and value of an “in-person” odessey.

If individual Canadian wish to partake of the wilderness it should be available albeit on a restricted plane so as to “protect” what we have.

Restrictions might be:

*a limited number of visitors per year

*a do not harm/leave no trace requirement for entry

*minimal/basic motorized travel etc.

*and others…

Rob Evans-Toronto-Canada Comment 9

8:42pm, 25 December 2009

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Dear Sir/Madam: This river is pure Canadian Wilderness. There are thermal springs, 4000 foot canyons, and beautiful deposits from hot mineral springs. Sheep,Goats and Moose to see as well as good fishing. The superb scenery will leave in a trance-like state. Guides are excellent cooks with good meals every evening. I paddle with Black Feather Outfiters and was delighted. Please do not put it off till your health will not permit the trip. This trip is the highlight of my life. My canoe went for the whole two weeks with rough waves and did not tip. Black Feather uses sturdy 17 canoes and a life-jacket for each person. Rob Evans,Toronto,Canada